How We Decided What To Name Our Son

How We Decided What To Name Our Sonhow we decided what to name our son

Choosing a name for a human being is an overwhelming task. The amount of power involved in this decision seems too much for two people to hold. The recipient of said name must bear it for life. The name will define them. Before ever meeting an individual, people tend to make assumptions and definitions of that person based on their name. It is often the first word a child learns to write. It’s how they will label every exam in school, every letter or email, every official document.

Because my husband and I felt such gravity in this naming business, we decided to take it very seriously.

We started talking about what we would name our children when we began the adoption process. I’ve had names in my head since I was little girl, but none of those seem to fit the new child that was growing in our hearts. When I found out I was pregnant, we had already picked out a couple names. However, we both agreed to reserve those names for our adopted child when he or she would enter into our family, even if that would be years down the road now that we were pregnant. So we started dreaming up new names.

We prayed for a long time about the kind of people God had in mind as he was designing our son (and twin sister) in my womb. The word “intercessor” kept coming to mind with our son. An intercessor is “one who stands in the gap.”

This sermon, by Eric Ludy, was highly influential in our understanding of the role of an intercessor.

In our prayers and daily interaction with the world around us, we began to understand the great need of someone who could be a bridge between God and humanity. We understand that all people are, by nature, not perfect. We choose to do things our way, not God’s way. This imperfection, also called sin, leads to a brokenness. This brokenness means we cannot have relationship with God, not now and not after death. There is no heaven for individuals who are unholy… the only thing we deserve is death and separation from God. Only by becoming perfect can we relate to God as our Father and Lord. Since we can’t be perfect, even if we try, we need an intercessor.

Isaiah 59:16 says about Jesus: “He saw that there was no man, and wondered that there was no one to intercede; then his own arm brought him salvation, and his righteousness upheld him.”

Jesus, God’s Son, was the only perfect human being. He became our intercessor when he offered an exchange for us: our sin-nature for his perfect one. For all who receive this gift, their sin nature is put on Jesus on the cross. In his death, the punishment we deserve for our rebellion against God, was served. In it’s place, we receive a new nature: holiness, perfection, and therefore relationship with God!

When humanity could not help itself, Jesus stepped in, sacrificed himself, and bridged the gap. In his great power as God’s son, Jesus raised himself from death (our deserved punishment, not his). He claimed holiness yet again and now stands before God, constantly pleading, or interceding, on our behalf.

This is a monumental truth. Its implications for a broken humanity are beyond liberating. The fact that we have an intercessor should change the way we think, love, act, feel, and speak.

It is so epic in fact, it even affects the names we choose for our children.

 

May I introduce Titus Zachariah Rosty.

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The name Titus means defender, a meaning similar to intercessor. Titus was also a Greek missionary and disciple of the apostle Paul.

We chose the middle name Zachariah to honor a dear friend who passed away last year. This man left behind a genuine Christ-centered legacy. His zeal for God and compassion for others deeply impacted his community and family. The name Zachariah means “remembered by the Lord.”

We see in Scripture that God did remember to send an intercessor. He did not forget his creation, but made a way for all of humanity to choose restoration through Jesus.

“God showed how much he loved us by sending his only Son into the world so that we might have eternal life through him.” 1 John 4:9

Our son’s name is our reminder of that. We pray daily that our son’s heart and mind recognize the gravity of Jesus’ gift of salvation. We hope he will share this truth in his daily life. And because we also want to prioritize this truth in our own lives, we chose an applicable name to constantly remind our own souls.

God has already designed the steps Titus will take as a boy, young fella, and eventually (hopefully) a strong man-of-God. What glimpse the Holy Spirit allowed us of that destiny was that Titus might:

  • Share his faith with friends on the playground…
  • Boldly stand up for truth in his college classes…
  • Forge awareness for the orphaned and abandoned…
  • Champion the cause of the hurting and the lost…
  • Be a defender of the weak (all of us), and a reminder that God did remember to send an intercessor.

“Defend the weak and the fatherless;
uphold the cause of the poor and the oppressed.” Psalm 82:3

Whether he is a banker, or a street-sweeper, or a linebacker for the Green Bay Packers, (after all, his name does mean “defender”), we pray his life will be a giant arrow pointing to Christ, our Savior.

Titus 2:11-15 (NIV)

11 For the grace of God has appeared that offers salvation to all people. 12 It teaches us to say “No” to ungodliness and worldly passions, and to live self-controlled, upright and godly lives in this present age, 13 while we wait for the blessed hope—the appearing of the glory of our great God and Savior, Jesus Christ, 14 who gave himself for us to redeem us from all wickedness and to purify for himself a people that are his very own, eager to do what is good. 15 These, then, are the things you should teach. Encourage and rebuke with all authority. Do not let anyone despise you.”

Check in soon for a post on how we chose our daughter’s name!

What did you name your kids? I’d love to hear any special meaning or reason behind your decision to name them!

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